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Expand Up @@ -32,22 +32,23 @@ Of course, you can usually make changes to your initial model, though sometimes

Consider an empty house. If you think of all of the rooms in the house, there are several ways that you might group them. For example, you may group them based on the function of the room (places to sleep; places to eat), or you might group them by characteristics (rooms with or without water, type of floor covering).

>> Work in teams of 2-3 to list several ways that you may group the rooms in the house. [3 min work on their own - then ask for some examples - take 5-7 of them and write them on a flip chart]
> Work in teams of 2-3 to list several ways that you may group the rooms in the house. [3 min work on their own - then ask for some examples - take 5-7 of them and write them on a flip chart]

Now that you have some ways to group the rooms, work with in the same teams to pick a primary factor for grouping the rooms in the house from the list that you have or from the list that you see on the flip chart. Once you have that primary factor, pick 2-3 secondary factors that you think are important. For example, if you picked [the primary user of the room | pick something from the flipchart list], your secondary classifications might be, [the relative amount of time spent in the room | something from the flipchart] and [the function of the room | something from the flipchart list].

>> Work in the same groups [5 min work on their own - then ask for choices - 1-2 of them. Ask why they selected those items as their primary and secondary factors.]
> Work in the same groups [5 min work on their own - then ask for choices - 1-2 of them. Ask why they selected those items as their primary and secondary factors.]

Now let's say that I needed to traverse your hierarchy of factors to determine all of the rooms that I need to examine to [refinish all of the wood floors | refresh all of the plumbing | paint in pink every room in which your cat spends more than 30% of its time | some other characteristic that wouldn't be obvious from the hierarchy presented by the teams]. How much would your room factor hierarchy system help or hinder the process of selecting rooms?

What would be the best way to organize the rooms to optimize for this situation? [open discussion]
> What would be the best way to organize the rooms to optimize for this situation? [open discussion]

Would you make a different choice for your room factor hierarchy if you knew that you would need to accommodate several different reasons for selecting a group of rooms?

[5 min - open discussion - things to bring out in the discussion

1. you won't know all of the reasons that you need to select rooms
2. It probably won't be possible to optimize for every selection that you may need to make, but there may be a structure that works well for the most common selection needs
3. Optimizing for one situation may make other situations nearly impossible to accommodate using the same hierarchy]
> [5 min - open discussion - things to bring out in the discussion
>
> 1. you won't know all of the reasons that you need to select rooms
> 2. It probably won't be possible to optimize for every selection that you may need to make, but there may be a structure that works well for the most common selection needs
> 3. Optimizing for one situation may make other situations nearly impossible to accommodate using the same hierarchy
> 4. How difficult would it be to adjust the hierarchy later? How should you adjust the hierarchy that you created to make it more flexible to accommodate what you don't yet know?]

Similar to the exercise that we just did in developing a factor hierarchy for the rooms in the house, in the next section we will talk about the most common ways to classify the parts of your organization to optimize grouping for the most common reasons for selecting a groups of people.
25 changes: 25 additions & 0 deletions _episodes/02-generalFactors.md
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title: "Understanding the factors that may affect your modeling"
teaching: 10
exercises: 0
questions:
- "Question here"
objectives:
- "List the objectives"
keypoints:
- "List the key takeaways for the episode"
---

Review in broad strokes the factors that may affect how you model your organization, project or collaboration. Explore some real-world examples.

## What are the most common factors for grouping people in your organization

There are many ways to group people in your organization. For tools like Membership Management Services, there are several common factors to consider:

1. Where does the data about the person come from - also known as "Systems of Record"
2. What are the conditions under which individuals gain or loose access to resources or services
3. Logical groups like departments, projects, or teams

## How does grouping work in COmanage

COmanage is a multi-tenet tool. This means that for each installation, one or more top-level groups can be expressed. These groups are called Collaborative Organizations or COs. Individuals are added to these fundamental groups (COs), but once there, the individuals can be included in multiple sub groups of the CO, called Collaboration Organization Units (or COUs.)
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A key decision that you will need to make when setting up COmanage is how you will model your organization, project or collaboration. Thoughtful consideration will both provide both significant built-in capabilities, as well as flexibility as you use information created and managed in COmanage with other systems and services.

In this lesson, you will learn what to consider when modeling your collaboration in COmanage, how to express this model, and how to make adjustments when needed.

**WHO IS THIS COURSE FOR?** Application administrators.

> ## Prerequisites
> CO102 or CO103 or equivalent

> ## Top Things You Need To Know
>
> 0. What natural groups do you have in your organization, project or collaboration?
> 1. Do you already have information about the individuals that you would like to register?
> 2. Where is the information about these individual stored? (i.e., in a system? a spreadsheet? on a sheet of paper? multiple places?)
> 3. Are there distinct "lifecycles" that you have with different groups? (For example, do some groups only exist for limited timeframes? Are there groups that take on new characteristics over time?)
> 4. What conditions explored above most affect system and resource access decisions?

## Schedule

Time | Section | Description
---- | ------- | -----------
  | [Setup](/episodes/setup.md) | Prepare for the lesson
00:20 | 1. [The benefits of good modeling](/episodes/modelingBenefits.md) | Why is this important? What does good modeling get you? What challenges can result from poor modeling?
00:00 | 2. [Understanding the factors that may affect your modeling](/episodes/generalFactors.md) | Review in broad strokes the factors that may affect how you model your organization, project or collaboration. Explore some real-world examples.
00:00 | 3. [Considering the factors for your situation](/episodes/yourFactors.md) | Using the modeling worksheet you will consider your own organization, project or collaboration and the factors that may affect its model within COmanage.
00:00 | 4. [Picking a model](/episodes/yourModel.md) | Working collaboratively with others in the class, choose a model that you think would work for your situation.
00:00 | 5. [Modeling within COmanage](/episodes/generalCous.md) | Learn about Collaboration Organization Units (COUs), and how they are used to express a model in COmanage.
00:00 | 6. [Express your model with COUs](/episodes/yourCous.md) | Using the model that you have picked, express it in COmanage.
00:00 | 7. [Making changes](/episodes/changesHappen.md) | It's impossible to anticipate all needs. How do you adjust your model when necessary?
00:00 | 8. [Advanced Topics](/episodes/advanced.md) | During this section we will review advanced topics of interest to the class. Some examples include: <list to come>

_The actual schedule may vary slightly depending on the topics and exercises chosen by the instructor._
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## Links

Author Name: *[item title][link-ref]*.
: Description



[link-ref]: https://the.link.org
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1. Please review the classes CO102 (COmanage for Virtual Organizations) or CO103 (COmanage for University IT) or equivalent. You should already be familiar with what COmanage is, and have some general idea of why it is used.
2. In this lesson you will be developing an organizational model to be used in COmanage. While it is possible to take this lesson using a made-up organization, you will get more insight from the class if you come prepared to try and model your existing organization.

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